Article Of The Month

  Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by worry that feels difficult to control and that is often out of proportion to the situation. People with GAD frequently report difficulties concentrating; they find it hard to focus on the task at hand and become distracted by their worry. Difficulty concentrating is also common in other…

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Chronic worry is the defining characteristic of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). According to Tom Borkovec’s Cognitive Avoidance Theory of Worry, worry is a verbal and thought-based activity. Essentially, when a person is worrying, it is like they are talking to themselves in their head about potential bad things that may happen in the future. This…

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  Research has shown that people who worry a lot tend to really dislike feeling uncertain. This characteristic is called “intolerance of uncertainty”. For worriers, the aversion to uncertainty can be so strong that it has also been referred to as an “uncertainty allergy”. Reacting to Uncertainty A true allergic reaction happens when someone’s immune…

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  Everyone worries. You can likely recall the last time you were worrying about something or someone. There are times when worrying may even be helpful, like helping prepare for an upcoming test or job interview. However, when worrying becomes excessive and difficult to control, it can make it hard to function and enjoy life….

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  Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a condition whose main feature is chronic, excessive and uncontrollable worrying, occurring most of the time. Although most of the research on worry has been conducted with adults, studies suggest that children and adolescents can also struggle with worry. GAD during childhood significantly increases the risk of developing other…

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  People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) worry chronically and excessively about many things including their relationships with others, finances, their performance at work, and common situations, like getting to appointments on time or going to an unfamiliar place for the first time. A growing body of research indicates that individuals with GAD (vs. non-anxious…

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  Individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) worry frequently and intensely most days, about common life situations (for example, relationships, finances, and routine activities like paying bills, meeting deadlines). Relative to non-anxious people, individuals with GAD tend to have a poorer understanding of their emotions, feel their negative emotions more intensely, and have a lot…

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